Hagerty’s top 10 classic cars to buy this year

Hagerty on Tuesday released its fifth annual “Bull Market” list of classic cars the insurer predicts will rise in value in the coming year.

These aren’t new cars tipped to become future classics, or old cars that have already maxed out in value. Instead, they are older cars that have nearly bottomed out on the depreciation curve and are expected to attract more interest from collectors in the future. There’s plenty of variety this year, too. Where else will you find a Ferrari and a Suzuki on the same list?

So take note of which of these future collectibles you’d like to add to your garage. These are Hagerty’s top 10 cars to buy in 2022.

1967 Cadillac DeVille convertible (photo via Hagerty)

1967 Cadillac DeVille convertible (photo via Hagerty)

1965-1970 Cadillac DeVille

In the past, collectors have snubbed this era of Cadillac in favor of its tail-finned 1950s predecessors, but Hagerty claims that’s changing. The average value of 1965-1970 DeVilles increased 14% between 2020 and 2021, according to the insurer’s data. At $28,000 for a car in “excellent” condition, these behemoths are still relatively affordable, although you’ll have to budget a lot for fuel.

1973 Ferrari 246 Dino (photo via Hagerty)

1973 Ferrari 246 Dino (photo via Hagerty)

1969-1974 Ferrari 246 Dino

Named after Enzo Ferrari’s son Alfredo “Dino” Ferrari, the Dino wasn’t sold with the Prancing Horse badge. That’s because it departed from 1960s Ferrari orthodoxy, and the Dino sported a transverse V-6 behind the driver. It was built as a tribute to Dino who, before his death in 1956, championed V-6 engines at Ferrari (something the automaker is now returning to). Just 3,761 were built, encompassing both hard-top GT and targa-roofed GTS body styles. The $365,800 average price may be a lot, but it would only cover the auction buyer’s premium on most other vintage Ferraris, Hagerty noted.

1990 Land Rover Defender (photo via Hagerty)

1990 Land Rover Defender (photo via Hagerty)

1983-1997 Land Rover Defender

Even with a new version in production, the original Land Rover Defender remains popular thanks to its classic design and rugged simplicity. North American-spec (NAS, in Land Rover parlance) models are also comparatively rare because, while U.K. Defender production carried on until 2016, U.S. sales ended in 1997. Original NAS models can top six figures today, but it’s also possible to import older Euro-spec Defenders under the 25-year rule. Those are averaging $61,400, according to Hagerty.

1983 Mazda RX-7 (photo via Hagerty)

1983 Mazda RX-7 (photo via Hagerty)

1979-1985 Mazda RX-7

The first-generation FB Mazda RX-7 launched with a 1.1-liter 12A rotary engine producing 100 horsepower, and capable of revving to 7,000 rpm. For its final two years, the RX-7 got the fuel-injected 1.3-liter 13B engine, boosting output to 135 hp. That still meant 0-60 mph in about 8.0 seconds, but the rotary’s high-revving nature and the FB RX-7’s claimed 50/50 weight distribution gave it plenty of character. Despite rust issues, large production volumes (more than 377,000 were sold in the U.S.) mean it’s still possible to pick up a good one for just $17,600, by Hagerty’s estimation.

1965 Mercedes-Benz 230SL (photo via Hagerty)

1965 Mercedes-Benz 230SL (photo via Hagerty)

1963-1967 Mercedes-Benz 230SL

The W113-generation 230SL had a 2.3-liter inline-6 producing 170 hp, but it was really the signature “Pagoda” roof that made it stand out. Mercedes built nearly 50,000 Pagoda SLs from 1963 to 1971, including later 250SL and 280SL models with more powerful engines, but the earlier 230SL is the best value, according to Hagerty, with an average price of $80,500 for an example in excellent condition.

1966 Pontiac GTO convertible (photo via Hagerty)

1966 Pontiac GTO convertible (photo via Hagerty)

1966-1967 Pontiac GTO

The 1964 Pontiac GTO is generally considered to be the car that launched the muscle car trend, but the follow-up 1966 model brought bolder styling. That year was also the last for the GTO’s original 389-cubic-inch V-8 with “Tri-Power” triple two-barrel carburetors; 1967 models got a 400-cubic-linch V-8 with a single four-barrel carburetor. At $100,200, average pricing has stayed flat, but that may not be the case for long, according to Hagerty.

1992 Porsche 968 (photo via Hagerty)

1992 Porsche 968 (photo via Hagerty)

1992-1995 Porsche 968

The 968 was the final form of the Porsche 924 and 944. It took the same basic platform and updated it for the 1990s with exposed headlights and a 236-hp 3.0-liter inline-4 engine. That could get the 968 from 0-60 mph in 5.9 seconds, according to a period Car and Driver test. The 968 was considered a bit long in the tooth when production ended in 1995 after just 12,776 were sold. That makes them rare today, boosting average prices to $38,000.

1986 Suzuki Samurai (photo via Hagerty)

1986 Suzuki Samurai (photo via Hagerty)

1985-1995 Suzuki Samurai

The Samurai gained an unfortunate reputation for rollovers when new, but today enthusiasts have come to appreciate its off-road capability. It was a predecessor to the modern Suzuki Jimny that’s worshipped as forbidden fruit by many U.S. enthusiasts. Average pricing has remained low, at $10,200, but good examples are getting hard to find, Hagerty noted.

2010 Tesla Roadster Sport (photo via Hagerty)

2010 Tesla Roadster Sport (photo via Hagerty)

2008-2012 Tesla Roadster Sport

The Roadster will go down in history as the car that launched Tesla. In later Sport form, the Lotus Elise-based sports car produced 248 hp, allowing for a claimed 0-60 mph time of 3.7 seconds. The Sport was quicker than earlier versions of the Roadster, and addressed some of those early car’s bugs, but Tesla also raised the price by about $20,000 to $130,450. Today, average pricing for an example in excellent condition starts at $97,000.

1983 Volvo 245 (photo via Hagerty)

1983 Volvo 245 (photo via Hagerty)

1975-1993 Volvo 245

The stereotypical Volvo wagon emphasizes stout build quality and utility over acceleration and handling, but that won these cars a loyal following and is beginning to attract attention from collectors. The nicest 245s have achieved “fringe” collector status, according to Hagerty, but it’s still possible to get a clean one for around $15,000, the insurer claims. Despite the fact that many cars were simply used and discarded, Hagerty says nice examples are still relatively easy to find—for now.